Tag Archives: History

ARC – Attack Retrieve Capture. The first ever massive-multiplayer game?

Way back in 1995 two students (John Vechey and Brian Fiete) created a computer game they called Attack Retrieve Capture which they then hosted on a network called Hoopy Entertainment.

This game was effectively a multiplayer game where people around the world with an internet connection could join teams and fight against each other with little flying saucer ships. Before the likes of Modern Warfare and other online games in which eSports has evolved into today. The community then on this game started their own leagues in order to capture the flag and crown the top clan.

Effectively this might have been one of the first ever games to host large numbers of players fighting this style of game. A standard game normally consists of eight players in a 4v4 match. There were other maps that could host 32 players against each other and there were one or two maps that could house 64 players against each other. That’s a lot of players attacking each other in their little ships and maybe this is the historical aspect which has been over-looked by the current industry of techno wizards.

At its height in the 1990s the game had a user base of a few thousand, not a lot but it could have done better if it wasn’t so miss-managed by the companies that brought the game and then swallowed it up into the downfall of Sierra Entertainment.

Sadly, the game is no longer with us, but there are other forms of it out there and the community has passed on.  However, it could be said because of the games unique ability for multiplayer it could have been the first to have such high player numbers facing off against each other. Only history will know.

A snippet of ARC I uploaded years ago to YouTube, looks a bit laggy, joggy, but the game played smoothly. 

Sir John Soanes Museum

13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, WC2A 3BP

How many people have heard of Sir John Soane or know who he is? An architect born in the 16th century the son of a brick layer established himself as one of the greats of British architecture. He went on to collect many paintings, various pieces of architecture, different types of curious objects and even managed to acquire the sarcophagus of Seti I when the British Museum couldn’t afford it.

The museum is his old London home next to a nice little park in Holburn. It’s free to visit and I would recommend it is well worth it.

The Wallace Collection

Hertford House, Manchester Square, London W1U 3BN

In the heart of London is another museum you can walk in for free like the British Museum or the National Gallery, but unless you have a tourist book you might not even know it exists.

Once you walk around Manchester Square you might not notice on first glance as there doesn’t look like much activity next to the hustle and bustle of Oxford Street. But you will see the banner behind the open cast iron gates to see the collection. You can join the free tour or view the house in your own time.

Once inside you will see treasures the biggest galleries in the world would love to get hold of.

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This collection acquired over the years by the Marquesses of Hertford then additions added to the collection from Sir Richard Wallace the son of the 4th Marquess. In 1897 his wife Lady Wallace with no heir bequeathed the collection to the British nation.

Unlike a National Trust property the house doesn’t look lived in as there are no bedrooms, sitting room of any type. Instead you will see that it’s one big museum gallery with a weapons room, display rooms and an art collection with rooms that rivals the National Gallery.

In you go on the tour you will learn more about parts of the collection and see painting done by masters such as Sir Anthony Van Dyck, Titian, Rembrandt, Velázquez and others.

I was highly impressed with the collection and recommend everyone who have an interest in history, art or ancient weapons to have a look.

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